About your Search

20130301
20130331
SHOW
Book TV 61
Today 35
Cavuto 28
( more )
STATION
CNNW 265
FOXNEWSW 257
MSNBCW 230
FBC 161
CSPAN 146
CSPAN2 125
CNBC 111
KGO (ABC) 111
KNTV (NBC) 81
KQED (PBS) 73
KPIX (CBS) 68
SFGTV 51
CURRENT 41
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 37
KTVU (FOX) 36
SFGTV2 32
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1947
TOPIC
new york 1951
washington 1257
obama 889
florida 556
china 468
europe 417
texas 415
chicago 365
colorado 309
israel 301
rome 301
( more )
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,951 (some duplicates have been removed)
are a democrat or a republican. it doesn't care whether you're liberal or conservative. climate change will affect all americans no matter what your political beliefs, your religious beliefs, your race, class, creed, et cetera, okay. and in the end, the only way we're going to deal with this issue is if we come together as a country and have a serious conversation, not about is it real. but what can we do about it. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and pea
solution to save medicare makes no changes for people 55 or older. >> congressman keith ellison on why ryan's medicare change is bad for america. >>> venezuelan president hugo chavez has died of cancer at the age of 58. what does this mean for u.s. relations? we'll bring you the latest. >>> a civil rights hero wants the washington redskins to change their offensive name. it will take an act of congress to get nfl owners to move on this. >>> the path to citizenship, which i would support -- >> jeb bush flips. >> we can't continue to make illegal immigration an easier path than legal immigration. >> flops. >> i'm for it. >> and flips again. the big panel weighs in on jeb's radical immigration 360. >>> holy cow! >> comedian stephen colbert's sister has her eye on a south carolina house seat. tonight we're talking to democratic candidate elizabeth colbert bush. good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching. i thought we would start with a little basketball tonight since it's march madness. this gentleman is dean smith, one of the all-time greats at the university of north carolin
and balances. , as much asbates their contentious and difficult theyconstantly changing, must be translated and applied to our armed forces. that it is sometimes true the political decisions, the social policy decisions, the legal or constitutional decisions that emerge in the civilian arena is transferred in exactly the same manner to our military, there are times when it is not. there are times when the particular necessities of national security or the particular intensity of the organization and values and mission of the military requires some adjustment in rules that we would adopt in the civilian sphere, but cannot adopt locke stock and barrel in exactly the same way in the context of our military. we're deeply grateful to our armed forces and those who served as the centuries, not just for all but a done to preserve our national security, but for the extraordinary commitment over history, despite many ups and downs, the powerful commitment to our fundamental values, to our commitment to the rule of law, to our conceptions of due process, and to the constitution of the united states i
obama wants to deliver change we can believe in but he can't do it alone. it's thursday march 28th. i'm alex wagner. this is "now." >>> want to make sure every american is listening today. >> the president's in-box is at capacity. gun control. immigration reform and that whole grand bargain thing. how much power does he have to get it done? david axelrod breaks it down. does politics imitate art? oscar winner barry levinson and "new york times" frank bruney on the culture curve. the rominee returns. mitt tries to convince us he's normal. >> the market is surging but the paychecks are paltry. what gives with the american economy. >>> have some inner growth i never experienced. >>> and disgraced governor turned drug counselor jim mcgreevey talks redemption and second chances. >>> surrounded by mothers who lost children to gun violence, this afternoon, president obama remembered the tragedy in newtown, connecticut. >> shame on us if we've forgotten. i haven't forgotten those kids. shame on us if we've forgotten. >> that line highlighted the fundamental problem for the white house. it's b
proposed at that location. in addition to the hard changes that we have made in the construction documents, and we have had the architect as they were required under their contract to incorporate a number of bid alternates, which will provide us with flexibility as we move forward to the award of the individual trade packages to make the decisions if additional cost containment measures are needed. and these are just a sampling of the measures that are included. a lot of them have to do with the architectal features of the building and the finishes of the building while preserving the programattic needs of the center. in aggregate between the value engineering and the deductive alternates there is more than $100 million in cost reductions that we have been able to make to the construction estimates and that is above and beyond the $100,000 that i mentioned before that the program was able to save by constructing the transit center in a bottom up approach with the (inaudible) ramp. >> before you move on to the rva. >> i just want to check in and see because there that was a lot of informati
change. a bright young people back to the fellows and teach florescent shop owners how to use social media and how to learn new skills. they created a program to encourage rather than by local products. they are a great example of young people not in cities, not in the spotlight during the son of hard work to move issues forward and make impact. people like him are represented in the over the country who have been newly empowered to create change. >> host: looking back over the course of history, every generation is known for something. what do you think the millennial generation will be known for in 50 years? >> guest: we will be known as the people who pushed the country and world in a better direction to help her in the world and a little bit of a course correction for most than good i don't think the generation of solve every problem in the world. are definitely on a good course to help change some of the ways for thinking about our world to be more responsible social minded good to waste the push businesses, successes we've had of toppling dictators all over the world are pretty
see them change. they are doing very well. the most exciting thing, our work is about empowering the girls. these girls can say no to being cut. they can dream of becoming lawyers, teachers, doctors, and we see my daughter do better than my son. i came back for girls in my community don't have to negotiate like i did to accept their dreams. that's why i wake up every morning. >> what a great smile. how inspiring. >>> on monday, soledad will have a sitdown interview with facebook coo sheryl sandberg. >> cnn newsroom with carol costello starts now. >>> happening now in the newsroom -- a gay marriage stunner. >> i'm announced today a change of heart. >> staunch ohio conservative rob portman, a dramatic reversal, backing same-sex marriage after his own son comes out. >> i now believe people ought to have the right to get married. >> politics getting very personal. also, knife fight. >> the small pocket knife is not going to result in a catastrophic failure of an aircraft. >> the tsa chief outspoken and outfront. we'll talk to one tsa agent. >> a really smart smartphone. the new samsu
at home, the biggest voices in the gun debate square off as congress gets ready to consider changes that have both sides up in arms. >> good morning from mason middle school in mason, ohio. today is monday, march 25th, 2013. and this is "the daily rundown." >> our thanks to the eighth graders at mason middle school in ohio. even that kid lying down. that would have been me in eighth grade. good morning to all of you. i'm chris alizza in for chuck todd this morning. secretary of state john kerry is in afghanistan on a previously unannounced appearance in the war zone. the second stop on a solo trip that took him to iraq over the weekend. but this was no photo op. kerry took the opportunity to have what he called a spirited discussion with iraqi leaders about their failure to stop or even inspect daily flights from iran, carrying weapons to the syrian army through iraqi air space. >> anything that supports president assad is problematic. and i made it very clear to the prime minister that the overflights from iran are, in fact, helping to sustain president assad. there are members of
thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed -- the official retirement age. the question is, how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years? >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, sitting in for gwen ifill this week, doyle mcmanus of the "los angeles times." doyle: good evening. the issue of same-sex marriage was front and senter this week in washington as never before. before the supreme court two, cases focused on the same social issue but raising very different legal issues. supporters and opponents were hoping the court would clarify whether gay and lesbian couples have the right to marry and if so, should they have the same benefits as opposite sex couples? in one case, a challenge to the defense of marriage act passed by congress and signed into law by bill clinton in 1996, defini
the knife ban isn't worth the risk. this change takes effect on april 25th. >>> a winter storm dumps more than a foot of snow in colorado. driving has been made dangerous on major interstates, canceled more than 40 flights in denver. along the continental divide, crews shot artillery shells into the side of a mountain to start a controlled avalanche to prevent a more dangerous natural one. demolitions are under way along the massachusetts coast after a late winter storm knocked at least three homes off their foundations and pushed them into the atlantic. the storm left a dozen homes on plum island uninhabitable. residents there long have fought coastal erosion and say the federal jetty system is making the problem worse. >>> did you remember to set your clocks ahead before going to bed last night? i certainly worried about it because i had to get up real early. if you haven't, it's all right. just know you're an hour behind this morning. daylight saving time began at 2:00 a.m. i know it's hard to lose that extra hour of sleep. what i keep telling myself, the bright side, we're gaining mor
to be coming around to the idea of marriage equality. some like rob portman have changed their position for personal reasons. and others, like raince priebus, for political expediency. the chairman of the gop which drafted the gop platform last summer is now arguing for inclusion. >> i know our principles and i know our parties believe that marriage is between one man and one woman. but i also know we have a party that's going to be inclusive and is going to listen to people and is going to allow differences of opinion in our party. >> but if certain voices seem intent to move forward on civil rights, the party's right flank is digging in its heels. >> young conservatives, 30 and under, 35 and under, gay marriage, all that matters. homosexual marriage. if the party makes that something official, that they support, they're not going to pull the homosexual activist voters away from the democrat party. but they are going to -- cause their base to stay home. and throw their hands up in utter frustration. >> similar frustration was echoed by evangelicals and social conservatives. family refo
rapid technological change and investments. and, you know, i have to say i think part of it is the public's deep-seeded unease with robots. i mean, this goes back to the hal -- [inaudible] and a few other things we remember from our childhood. and, of course, political theater it was, but senator rand paul's filibuster really, i think, did to some degree muddy public understanding of the domestic uses of uas. so we don't do ourselves any favors either from an industry standpoint when we keep changing the names. i could go around this room, and i bet everyone here could come up with a different one. uas, uav, rpv. and now, get this, the latest one? uninhabited aerial vehicles? oh, come on. sexism? give me a break. [laughter] i think our speakers will shed light, though, on some of the more important of uas concern. i'm so delighted that from california frank pace was willing and able to come in, the president and ceo of general b atomics. and, of course, the developer of the predator, among other very leading aircraft in this area. what i really think about it, and i th
for his beliefs, and the police may change a bit over the years is not terribly much. they are still fighting for them. and i think that's inspiring. [inaudible] >> dina, thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much. >> is there a nonfiction author or book you would like to see featured on booktv? send us an e-mail at booktv@c-span.org. or tweet us at twitter.com/booktv. >> up next on booktv, "after words" with guest host this week, msnbc host s. e. cupp. this week david burstein and his book "fast future: how the millennial generation is shaping our world." in the county argued there are currently between 18 and 30 years of age are the largest generation in u.s. history. more ethnically diverse than digitally tuned in than others. mr. burstein says melinda's are increasing and more influential a fast-moving, more integrated world. this program lasts about an hour. >> host: so, david, your millennial writing about millennials sort of advising town elders about the issues of a generation. that takes some background. how old are you? >> guest: 24. >> host: where did you go to school?
they will definitely change the complexion of the business, the profitability of the business, but that it is neither going to be a smooth transition for an immediate transition and that is what happens when you make fundamental changes the way companies do business. lori: thank you very much. fedex today around $100. melissa: we're counting down to today's fed announcement at 2:00 p.m. eastern, the fed keeping the money flowing. how the fed chairman stands to get out of all of this. lori: the cyber threat and some south korean banks financial firms here on high alert. melissa: congress may be ready to agree on one thing. how lawmakers are ready to push ahead with the keystone pipeline. are they doing it without the president? first, take a look at metals heading out to break. trading lower on gold and silver, but copper is up 1.3%. we will be right back. friday night, buddy. you are gonna need a wingman. and my cash back keeps the party going. but my airline miles take it worldwide. [ male announcer ] it shouldn't be this hard. with creditcards.com, it's easy to search hundreds of cards and apply on
the argument that it actually changed people's lives and that it actually changed the culturement of it's also come under criticism more recently for not, for only reflecting the lyes of a very -- lives of a very small group of people, for not talking about working class women who had no choice but to work all along and not talking about people of other sexual preferences who may have already found themselves kind of askew or outside of conventional life. but what i want to do today a little bit is talk about, um, the ongoing power of this classic. and i recently taught this book to my undergrads at nyu, a couple of who are here in this audience, who do not ever hesitate to tell me if something is boring,er v.a. relevant, dated, no longer worthy of their important attention. [laughter] so it was actually kind of amazing to me that in this class, the class really came to life. and the book sort of spoke to them in really interesting ways. so i want to talk about the new feminine misstocks that are oppressing us -- mystiques that are oppressing us still, and i want to talk about the old feminine
change is happening, but celebrities and politicians have solutions. these cool people own electric and hybrid cars. now my mayor wants to ban styrofoam cups. >> it is something we can do without. >> what is next? john: in the name of protecting earth, we have green tyranny. that is our show tonight. >> and now, john stossel. john: green tyranny is what we called this show, but tierney is a harsh word, a thing of dictatorship. a little over the top. most don't seem to rise to that. also, bans on pollution are actually a good thing, i'm glad government rules committee air and water cleaner. and i was a kid there was so much soot in the air, we didn't open the window. that has changed for the better. they change the water so much so that the rivers around manhattan are now clean enough to swim in. even here within sight of the empire state building within a short distance of millions of people flushing, i am willing to do this. it was freezing cold, but no longer so filthy. so hooray for the epa. so why do i use the phrase "green tyranny?" because government always goes too far. years
these cute little animals. and emissions threatening all of earth. devastating worldwide climate change is happening, but celebrities and politicians have solutions. these cool people own electric and hybrid cars. now my mayor wants to ban styrofoam cups. >> it is something we can do without. >> what is next? john: in the name of protecting earth, we have green tyranny. that is our show tonight. >> and now, john stossel. john: green tyranny is what we called this show, but tierney is a harsh word, a thing of dictatorship. a little over the top. most don't seem toise to that. also, bans on pollution are actually a good thing, i'm gla government rules committee air and water cleaner. and i was a kid there was so much soot in the air, we didn't open the window. that has changed for the better. they change the water so much so that the rivers around manhattan are now clean enough to swim in. even here within sightf the empire state building within a short distance of millions of people flushing, i am willing to do this. it was freezing cold, but no longer so filthy. so hooray for the epa. s
of both the expanding economy and schedule changes in rules. a comparison average of about 18% over the past 40 years. at the same time, if current laws remain in place, federal spending will fall relative to the size of the economy and then rise again. the decline can be traced to be discretionary funding. and to a drop off that sense to go up when the economy is weak. -- that tend to go up when the economy is weak.but later in the decade, spending turns up again . part of this is the return of interest rates to more normal levels and our projection that would push up interest payments to nearly their highest share of gdp in did years. another of the decade a significant expansion of federal health-care programs and rising health-care costs per person will push up spending on the largest federal programs, social security, medicare, medicaid. by 2020.-- by 2023, it reaches 23% a g.d.p. what does this mean for federal debt that we expect that will reach 76% of gdp this year, at the highest since 1950. we protect it will be higher than the 39% average. it will be rising again as part
that in washington tonight. do relations with america change? >> it was a surprise to hear jesse jackson praying and then he asked got to build bridges between the states and venezuela. the states are the only ones who pay cash for 3,000 barrels. the others are interchanged with china, russia and places in the caribbean. there's a hate and love relation. whenever it's going to be better then the government says that the yankees cater to chavez and they fire our assistant to chavez here. but i think his successor must be more conciliatory. i think the surprise was jesse jackson and maybe he was surprised that someone asked for better relations with the states. they were helping a lot on establishing relations. >> you mentioned the oil and, of course, america is the biggest importer of venezuelan oil. it has to have good relations with this country but it is looking for an alternative to this system of government. do you think now the opposition in venezuela could have success? >> it would be very difficult. the emotion on chavez, the sentiment and the government controls all the power. there's no
to treat my son that way? he decided in the and went on cnn and admitted he changed his mind. >> i'm announcing today a change of heart on a issue that a lot of people feel strongly about. it has to do with gay couple's right to marry. and i have taken a position against gay marry, rooted in part in my faith and my faith tradition. my son came to my wife and i and told us that he was gay, and that it was not a choice. >> bill: and he said given all of my years of being on the other side of this issue that really caused me to take another look at it. >> and that launched an interesting process for me, which was rethinking my position, talking with religious leaders and in the end changing my position on the issue. now believe that people ought to have the right to get married. >> bill: so he has done a total 180. now this is rob portman alone. he doesn't speak for the republican party or any other politician from ohio. >> rob is a great friend and long-time ally and i appear he has decided to change his view on this, but i believe that marriage is a union of a
become a movement, you can try to change with the government or negotiate with the government. deps on your strategy. start small, focus, build around local nonpolitical issues, which is where you learn the technology of nonviolent struggle. then you achieve a little victory. then the people start joining because the people who join the things which are successful. and if you are branded well and know how to communicate, you have a movement, and then see how the government will deal with it, because the more oppressive government is, the less space for use of the suppression. because they already are using every single way of censorship, and they're, after 30 years, i don't find them very flexible in dealing with the new ways of protesting. the more closed the system, the more oppressive regime, the less flexible. really flexible regimes are not the most -- when you look at the really flexible regimes who learned fast, like the one in venezuela or russia, they're not north koreas them real problem with north korea, once they're there, they're cemented in their own little thing. so w
innovative way to create change in their school. music, plays, art, mapping. >> 97 freshmen feel there's bullying in the cafeteria. >> i honestly didn't feel we have as much bullying as other students think so that was an opportunity to keep going. >> we are all different in our all different ways. >> you need everybody. >> as we filmed these stories around the country, we've seen the powerful conversations that have surfaced when they have the deeper understanding of what it means not to take action. >> we can trace racism and prejudice all the way back. we may not be able to make amends for what maybe our an ancestors did, but we can stop some of these things from happening in the future. >> we are becoming empowered. i will make a difference. >> when a community sees its young people stand up to resist intolerance, to resist bullying, they can say why can't we take this to a larger level? they can lead and change an entire community. >> i can be the person that helps the world. >> thanks, becky, and thank you for keeping it short. rick phillips, executive director of community mat
're not talking about secular model of reform meaning changes to church teaching on matters such as abortion or birth control. instead they're talking about changes in business management in the vatican towards making the bureaucracy here more transparent, that is both internally and externally, making it clearer who's making decisions and why and also doing a better job communicating with the outside world towards making it more accountable. that is the idea that there ought to be penalties for poor performance and towards making it efficient. the notion being is that there thinking in centuries may have cut it once upon a while but in a 21st century world it simply doesn't do it anymore. that's what these cardinals mean by reform and they have embraced pope francis tasman who can deliver it. whether it plays out in practice that way, of course, remains to be seen. >> brown: is there an expectation that on one key matter the sexual abuse scandals that he has to do something fairly quickly,? whether it's make a gesture or take action? >> well, i think it's very clear to anyone who's been pay
of that change -- to the first part of the book we touch on that. well we meant to the country overall. a couple of vignettes of this that all talk about briefly. a book written on something. a book about a russian sub that went down in the northwest pacific the russians to know where was. they wanted to recover it. code books were important. the technology was important. it was decided they would try and recover. the median my apartment, the general counsel of the cia, is deputy, the deputy of howard hughes. a very large vessel to hold in the center that would scoop this up. then you had to think about what if the russians decided what we were doing was looking for the submarine. what would happen if they fired on us? could not bring this tool id. we knew. put it on the beach. that was not going to work. so we had to take the pacific islands that was obviously in the european position. bill the report. we provided the insurance without operation. there are many gabonese that have the vision was still, the underwriting skill to take on a project like that. i happen to be -- while the operation w
very fine people at the time. all of that changed. the first part of the book touches on that. but they show what we meant to the country overall. there's a couple of vignettes i will talk about briefly. there is a book written on something called tacloban marine. a book about a russian said that went down in the northwest pacific and the russians didn't know where wes. they looked and looked and couldn't find it. the u.s. to exactly where it was and wanted to recover it because it was a nuclear sub. codebooks were important than the technology was important. it was decided they would try and recover. there's a meeting in my apartment in new york with the general counsel of the eye it, the dpd howard hughes. if they were going to do that, they had to build the bustle, a large vessel with the whole of the center scoop this out. you had to think about what is the russians decided but we were doing was looking for that been aware was pure but would have been if they fired on us? couldn't bring it to i.e. put it on the beach? that wasn't going to work? said they had to find some p
poverty, it didn't provide a way to change ghettoization, it didn't reach the full goals that the participants in the civil rights movement were really aspiring to of freedom, of power. and so what you had in the starting really in '66 it became a very big call was a question, black power. how do we build black power? there were dozens of organizations in most major cities asking this question and trying to thub it. think about it. there were a lot of different kinds of approaches. one important kind of theoretical answer to this was to say we're not just going to, you know, it's not that we just want to be part of america. america as it's constituted is an imperial power, and we need to challenge that imperialism as part and parcel of the colonial struggle not only in africa, but nationally. so there were organizations in the bay area asking that question on a small scale. one organization called the rove louis their action movement, both bobby seale and huey newton participated and drew a number of ideas from there, but there were different kinds of answers, right? and
. people do not change what they do based on what they know. the change what they do, based on how they feel. when we appreciate that insight we think of the effort -- within differently about delivering certain messages. the message has to be delivered with carey energy, it does not matter how people hear the at -- with care and energy, it does not matter how people hear the message. we have to make it easy for people to do the right thing. we have to grease the road to success. about 20% extra brani energy is required to think to come up with a new idea. we do not want to spend that energy wistfully. it is not because people are dumb or foolish, it is our natural human desire not to have to reinvent the wheel every day. that is why i think we can make things easier. let me show you a slide on numbers of mortality. this is a pretty good estimate of premature mortality causes. some of them are genetic, some environmental. look at the purple part of this graph, bad as medical access. that is the reality that not having access to health care is like having a ship coal and oil into do
look at the past, the present and the future? >> you can change what is then missing by changing the software, by changing what is projected and missing. so, missing isn't a static installation. it is an installation that is going to grow and change over time. and she has worked to bring all of this information together from laboratory after laboratory including, fortunately, our great fwroup of researche e-- g researchers at the california academy. >> this couldn't have been more site specific to this place and we think just visually in terms of its scupltural form it really holds its own against the architectural largest and grandeur of the building. it is an unusual compelling object. we think it will draw people out on the terrace, they will see the big cone and say what is that. then as they approach the cone tell hear these very unusual sounds that were obtained from the cornell orinthology lab. >> we have the largest recording of birds, mammals, frogs and insects and a huge library of videos. so this is an absolutely perfect opportunity for us to team up with a world renow
in venezuela and they're asking that in washington tonight. do relations with america change? >> it was a surprise to hear jesse jackson praying and then he asked got to build bridges between the states and venezuela. the states are the only ones who pay cash for 3,000 barrels. the others are interchanged with china, russia and places in the caribbean. there's a hate and love relation. whenever it's going to be better then the government says that the yankees cater to chavez and they fire our assistant to chavez here. but i think his successor must be more conciliatory. i think the surprise was jesse jackson and maybe he was surprised that someone asked for better relations with the states. they were helping a lot on establishing relations. >> you mentioned the oil and, of course, america is the biggest importer of venezuelan oil. it has to have good relations with this country but it is looking for an alternative to this system of government. do you think now the opposition in venezuela could have success? >> it would be very difficult. the emotion on chavez, the sentiment a
doing about that? >> we are following up on the recommendations to take action. there are system changes we can make like statistical models, front aend. we could work on fasa. if there is a pattern that looks like suspicious behavior, you can require more personal identification to go on in the application process. some of these require statutory changes. if you're going to change the eligibility requirements, that requires congress to act. >> are you making those recommendations to congress? >> we will work with congress and pursue what we think is the right reproaapproach. >> could you provide to this committee the recommendations you have made for statutory changes and the recommendations you are making for rule changes? >> yes, there will be processed where we're starting with hearings. >> can you provide what is your doing? -- what is your doing to change the statute? >> yes, part of the regulatory process -- we have to honor the process which says we cannot have a prescribed -- proscribes prescription before we start the roll-making process. when the agenda gets upset, we will sh
in the caucus in the senate says he is certainly not happy and he thinks this change is dangerous and he spoke to reporters on sunday, which is rare. here is what he had to say. >> the tsa ought to smell the coffee. >> reporter: you might call them pocket knives or swiss army knives, have blades smaller than 2.6 inches, a little bit longer than, say, your house key. lonts list of newly allowed things to carry on are ski poles, lacrosse stick and bill yard cues. of course, frederica, not hearing many arguments about those things, clearly unwieldy, it is the knifes that are the main issue here. as senator schumer saying, he thinks because they can folksily hurt an individual, that's one reason that flight attendants are very concerned about this as well. tsa you however, sees things very differently. from tsa's perspective this is about their job being a priority on trying to prevent terrorists from taking over an entire plane. the tsa says that cockpits are protected now, small knifes can no longer get a terrorist to the plane's controls but the tsa says hunting for those knives can distract th
the way that things are going. >> think in copenhagen, the status of the car has changed. people are not used to having cars anymore. they sometimes use a car and go to a car sharing club or something. it is socially acceptable to cycle. 30, 40 years ago, you would maybe be seen as a loser if he came on a bicycle, -- if you came on a bicycle, but now it is for everybody. everyone is cycling. it is not, the former generation in the 60's, denmark, they could afford to buy a car and they really enjoyed it. they wanted to show it, and all trips they made or made by cars, the the new generation has a completely different view. >> i already gave my answer during my presentation. it is everything, especially if it is business or businessmen, it is money driven. show it is comparative in cost or it is less cost for business. because if you show that, there is a discussion. >> let me ask before i go to the next question, what in your experience the you believe was the most influential and excepting the different stages of the car and its role in the city? i am sure over 40 years, your att
emerges as the next leader of the catholic church, change is on the way. and the protesters we saw today were detained by police, making for a very intense moment in what was otherwise a peaceful day. we met pilgrims from europe, latin america, asia, they were singing, cheering, they were rooting for the cardinals from their own countries. in some ways, it really felt like a little bit of a soccer match out there. >> cecilia, thanks so much. >>> i want to turn now to father john wauch of rome via chicago who has been watching all day the conclave. we heard cecilia talk about the crowds. you were saying to me, it was a different feeling you had out there today. >> i think that what you see is, once the conclave has begun, there's a change in the air. there's a change in the tone surrounding the vatican. >> taking this seriously, knowing this matters? >> you could say that the opening of the conclave, with the music and the hymns and the pageantry of it, the prayer, casts a spell, almost, on the city. and the people in the square this evening, waiting for the smoke, i think, you get a sens
a certain amount of change. i just want to caution -- i think a lot of americans think -- when they think of reform and change they think we're going to have women priests. that was not a realistic expectation given the cardinals who were in there. i think what they mean by reform touched other issues, partly reorganization of the curia, its relationships with local bishops and, again, are we going to focus a little bitless maybe on the traditional latin mass and a little bit more on caring for the poor. >> ifill: so this is not a pope or a papacy we're going to see any kind of change when it comes to things like abortion or -- >> of course not. >> ifill: gay marriage. >> of course not. >> ifill: or adoption or any social issues that get us so worked up, especially in the united states? >> no, and these are not issues in the latin american church. when 50% of your people are living below the poverty line, shame on you if you're worried about other issues like that. you've got to be very hand on worried about feeding your people so they don't go to bet hungry at night. >> ifill: he was quo
to pick up his bags and pay his bill. small gestures that may signal bigger changes ahead. >> he can make the changes needed because he knows from his own experience in buenos aires what has been missing here in rome. >> reporter: today, francis focused on winning the hearts of romans. going to a basilica dedicated to christ's mother, the virgin mary, considered to be a protector of rome. this souvenir shop near the vatican quickly switched allegiances, quickly selling out of 6,000 photos of the new pope. embracing a more humble image in this regal setting. anne thompson, nbc news, the vatican. >>> i'm miguel almaguer in buenos aires. at an afternoon mass inside the city's main cathedral, the faithful pray for the man who once led their church and will now lead the catholic world. when he was cardinal here, pope francis often sat in the back pews, accessible to anyone seeking his help. his sister said today he never wanted the papacy. [ speaking in a foreign language ] >> reporter: when i met john paul ii, i looked up and saw his gaze of infinite loneliness. my brother's gaze reflects lov
. the crisis is threatening the eurozone. >> reports coming in from europe suggest the eu may have changed the deal, to allow people with deposits of less than 100,000 euros to get off that tax. i spoke a short time ago with former u.s. treasury secretary tim -- larry suckers -- i spoke a short time ago with former u.s. treasury secretary larry summers. >> it changed the world. sarah gave a was a small place -- sarajevo was a small place. it matters so much because of theexample that may be in process of being set. it has heretofore been assumed that insured deposits of ordinary citizens are as good a credit as exists in these countries. the apparent decision that is not the case, with the endorsement of the european authorities, with the endorsement of the imf, calls that into question. there is little wonder that markets are experiencing a change in the way the world that, and it is change they find unsettling. >> if you are a middle aged retiree in italy or spain today, are you really looking at what is happening in cyprus and thinking, you know what, i might take my savings out of the
and changing underneath your feet. so that's what i think about when israel's faced with these challenges. that sense of an israel that is surrounded by many in this region who still reject it and many in fact world who refuse to accept it. that's why the security of the jewish people in israel is so important. it cannot be taken for granted. but make no mistake. those who adhere to the ideology of rejecting israel's right to exist, they might as well reject the earth beneath them or the sky above because israel's not going anywhere. [ applause ] and today i want to tell you, particularly the young people, so that there's no mistake here, so long as there is a united states of america -- [ speaking foreign language ] you are not alone. the question is, what kind of future israel will look forward to? israel is not going anywhere, but especially for the young people in this audience, the question is, what does its future hold? and that brings me to the subject of peace. i know israel has taken risks for peace. brave leaders reached treaties with two of your neighbors. you made credible pro
for the light. but ermon than diplomacy the man was hoping to change the way america was seen in the world when we came into office. obama has shown a passionate respect for their country that is sweet music to israeli ears and many liked his push for peace. one newspaper declared "love has paid a royal visit." >> for our sons and daughters are not born to hate. they are taught to hate. so let us fill their young hearts with the same understanding and compassion that we hope others have for them. >> he mailed tribute to zionism at the grave of its modern founder. the new friendlier approach is already working and he's urging israeli prime minister netanyahu -- he's made a surprising apology to his turkish counterpart in 2009 obama's first big policy speech was in crier ro. -- cairo. >> and this cycle of suspicion and discord mustened. >> tonight the president arrived in jordan knowing many in the arab world watched that speech and waited and wapetted. in this trendy tafoya in the jordanian capital those i talked tofelt let down, further -- to felt let down. >> i think he is exactly like all the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,951 (some duplicates have been removed)